Mentors
Philippe Aghion
Economist; Professor at College de France and at London School of Economics

Philippe Aghion is an expert in the economics of growth and in contract theory. His Schumpeterian Growth paradigm, which he developed together with Peter Howitt, has been used to analyze the design of growth policies and the role of the state in economic growth. Among other prestigious awards and honors, he has been awarded the Yrjo Jahnsson Award of the best European economist under 45 in 2001, the John Von Neumann Award in 2009, and the BBVA Frontier of Knowledge Award in 2020. He is a Professor at the College de France and at the London School of Economics, and a fellow of the Econometric Society and of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Robert Aumann
Economist; Professor at the Center for the Study of Rationality in the Hebrew University of Jerusalem; Winner of the 2005 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences

Robert Aumann is widely recognized for his fundamental contributions to game theory, mathematical economics, and related areas. Together with mathematician Michael Bahir Maschler, he applied game theory to analyze Talmudic dilemmas. Laureate of the 1994 Israel Prize in economics and 2005 Jon Von Neumann Theory Prize, he was awarded a Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences in 2005. Robert Aumann is Professor at the Center for the Study of Rationality in the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.

Jack Copeland
Distinguished Professor of Philosophy at the University of Canterbury in New Zealand

Jack Copelands expertise lies in cognitive science, mathematical logic, and philosophy of computation. In 2020 he was awarded the Te Apārangi Humanities Aronui Medal for research into the foundations, philosophy and history of computing. The citation for the American Philosophical Associations Barwise Prize, awarded in 2017, describes him as the world-wide expert on Alan Turing and a leading philosopher of AI, computing and information. He received the Covey Award from the International Association of Computing and Philosophy in 2016 and his name has been on the IT History Society Honor Roll since 2017. Jack was John Findlay Visiting Professor of Philosophy at Boston University in 2018 and the Royden Davis Visiting Chair in Psychology at Georgetown University, Washington DC, in 2012. He is Co-Director and Permanent International Fellow of the Turing Centre at Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETH) in Zürich, and Honorary Research Professor of Philosophy at the University of Queensland. Jack is Distinguished Professor of Philosophy at the University of Canterbury in New Zealand, where he is Director of the Turing Archive for the History of Computing.

Toshio Fukuda
Emeritus professor at Nagoya University; 2020 President of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers

Toshio Fukuda is a world-leading researc